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Foodborne Chemicals: References

1. Saper RB, Kales SN, Paquin J, et al. Heavy metal content of ayurvedic herbal medicine products. JAMA. 2004;292:2868-2873.

2. US Department of Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, Frequently Asked Questions. Lead in Folk Medicine: Questions and Answers. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/faq/folk%20meds.htm. Accessed January 25, 2006.

3. Chuang HY, Tsai SY, Chao KY, et al. The influence of milk intake on the lead toxicity to the sensory nervous system in lead workers. Neurotoxicology. 2004;25:941-949.

4. Simon JA, Hudes ES. Relationship of ascorbic acid to blood lead levels. JAMA. 1999;281:2289-2293.

5. Lasky T, Sun W, Kadry A, Hoffman MK. Mean total arsenic concentrations in chicken 1989-2000 and estimated exposures for consumers of chicken. Environ Health Perspect. 2004;112:18-21.

6. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. ToxFAQs for Arsenic. Available at:
http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/tfacts2.html. Accessed January 25, 2006.

7. US Environmental Protection Agency. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs). Available at: http://www.epa.gov/opptintr/pcb/index.html.
Accessed November 15, 2005.

8. World Health Organization. Dioxins and Their Effects on Human Health (fact sheet No. 225, June 1999). Available at:
http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs225/en/index.html.
Accessed November 15, 2005.

9. Jacobson JL, Jacobson SW. Intellectual impairment in children exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls in utero. N Engl J Med. 1996;335:783-789.

10. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Toxicological Profile for Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs). Available at: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp17.html. Accessed January 26, 2006.

11. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Toxicological Profile for Chlorinated Dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs). Available at: http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxprofiles/tp104.html. Accessed January 26, 2006.

12. Weiss B, Amler S, Amler RW. Pesticides. Pediatrics. 2004;113:1030-1036.

13. Landrigan PJ, Mattison DR, Babich HJ, et al, for the Committee on Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children. Report on Pesticides in the Diets of Infants and Children. National Research Council. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 1993.

14. Wolff M. Occupationally derived chemicals in breast milk. Am J Ind Med. 1983;4:259-281.

15. Konek CT, Illg KD, Al-Abadleh HA, et al. Nonlinear optical studies of the agricultural antibiotic morantel interacting with silica/water interfaces. J Am Chem Soc. 2005;127:15771-15777.

16. Kim SH, Wei CI, Tzou YM, An H. Multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from farm environments and retail products in Oklahoma. J Food Prot. 2005;68:2022-2029.

17. Padungton P, Kaneene JB. Campylobacter spp in humans, chickens, pigs and their antimicrobial resistance. J Vet Med Sci. 2003;65:161-170.

18. Berends BR, van den Bogaard AE, Van Knapen F, Snijders JM. Human health hazards associated with the administration of antimicrobials to slaughter animals. Part II. An assessment of the risks of resistant bacteria in pigs and pork. Vet Q. 2001;23:10-21.

19. Teuber M. Spread of antibiotic resistance with food-borne pathogens. Cell Mol Life Sci. 1999;56:755-763.

20. Keating GA, Bogen KT. Estimates of heterocyclic amine intake in the US population. Journal of Chromatography B. 2004;802:127-133.

21. Sugimura T, Wakabayashi K, Nakagama H, Nagao M. Heterocyclic amines: Mutagens/carcinogens produced during cooking of meat and fish. Cancer Sci. 2004;95:290-299.

22. Knize MG, Kulp KS, Salmon CP, Keating GA, Felton JS. Factors affecting human heterocyclic amine intake and the metabolism of PhIP. Mutat Res. 2002;506-507:153-162.

23. Walters DG, Young PJ, Agus C, et al. Cruciferous vegetable consumption alters the metabolism of the dietary carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in humans. Carcinogenesis. 2004;25:1659-1669.

24. Murray S, Lake BG, Gray S, et al. Effect of cruciferous vegetable consumption on heterocyclic aromatic amine metabolism in man. Carcinogenesis. 2001;22:1413-1420.

25. Potter JD, Steinmetz K. Vegetables, fruit and phytoestrogens as preventive agents. IARC Sci Publ. 1996;139:61-90.

26. Milner JA. A historical perspective on garlic and cancer. J Nutr. 2001;131(suppl 3):1027S-1031S.

27. Chow CK, Hong CB. Dietary vitamin E and selenium and toxicity of nitrite and nitrate. Toxicology. 2002;180:195-207.

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